New Release! “Go for No” for Network Marketing

go for no for network marketing

Richard Fenton, Andrea Waltz and Ray Higdon are excited to announce the publication of Go for No! for Network Marketing.  A little lengthier than the original fable, the new book takes the “go for no” philosophies and expands them into greater detail along with Ray’s expertise on the topics. Plus, there are 17 “Go for No!’”stories featuring today’s top leaders, experts, and mega earners in the profession and a 10-point action plan at the end of the book.

Enjoy a book excerpt below. 

Never Make Decisions for Others—Andrea Waltz

One of the worst things a salesperson can do is prejudging someone’s ability or willingness to buy what they have. In other words, saying no for the customer.

Your opinion about whether a person will say yes or no is exactly that—an opinion.

Your opinion about whether a person will say yes or no is exactly that—an opinion. Click To Tweet

Whatever you think someone will decide to do, or how much you think someone has to spend, is presumptive and irrelevant. The only thing that matters is what the prospective customer thinks and is willing to spend.

Now why is it that people tend to prejudge others?

Simple.

The reason we prejudge is to eliminate the need to have them say no to us. But if your goal is to increase the number of no’s you hear, then prejudging makes no sense whatsoever.

To prejudge someone because they may say no is to engage in self-rejection, where we say no to ourselves without even giving the prospect the chance.

You must give everyone the opportunity to say no to you because if you don’t, you’re simply saying no to yourself.

The truth is that self-rejection is the worst kind of rejection there is. If someone else rejects you, okay. It’s painful sometimes, but you can live with that, right?

The truth is that self-rejection is the worst kind of rejection there is Click To Tweet

But to reject yourself? That’s not just painful—it’s criminal.

Ray Higdon’s Take on Prejudging

It’s extremely important not to prejudge others, and I’ve had to learn this lesson over and over.

Never prejudge anyone. Ever.

Some people are very adamant about wearing their success on their sleeve, dressing to the nines and looking super sharp. And I can tell you from attending hundreds of events over the years—in different countries all over the world—the sharpest, best-dressed person is often the most over-leveraged, dead-broke person in the room. And the person you’re sitting next to—the one in the overalls that you’ve been ignoring all night—that person is a millionaire. You simply never know.

This is especially true of your cold market, of course. But it can be true of your warm market, too. A lot of people just don’t talk about how much money they have to invest in a business, even people you think you know really well. You have zero idea what their real net worth is. For example, how much money do your parents have in their savings account right now? Or your next-door neighbors? Or the person who sits across from you at work?

You just can’t judge.

You can also never judge how hungry someone is—meaning their internal motivation—by what you know about them or by how they look. You can’t judge someone’s hunger or passion until you see them in the game.

You can’t judge someone’s hunger or passion until you see them in the game. Click To Tweet

When my buddy invited me to a home meeting back in July of 2009, I was still broke, in personal foreclosure, and being chased by bill collectors. I had been in this funk for about a year. I was not clinically depressed but probably borderline depressed. Life just wasn’t a bowl of cherries at the time. If asked to present my resume to someone, it wouldn’t have been pretty. I wasn’t in just one foreclosure—I was in eight.

All my real-estate investment properties were being whisked away. My financial shape was worse than bad. And I could easily have been prejudged.

But the one thing that doesn’t show up on a resume is your hunger for success. I was hungry. I was going to make it happen, come hell or high water. I didn’t know exactly how, but I was going to dig myself out of the hole that I was in—and I did.

Within five months, I was earning $10,000 a month. Month seven, I was at $40,000. Month ten, $50,000. No one could have known that based on my clothing, my resume, or my initial bank account.

You can’t judge someone’s level of hunger, and hunger is—in my opinion—the biggest predictor for whether someone’s going to make it happen in this business.

Hunger is the biggest predictor for whether someone’s going to make it happen in this business. Click To Tweet

 

Richard Fenton and Andrea Waltz are authors of the bestselling book Go for No!, along with several other business fables, including their newest Go for No! for Network Marketing.’ Speaking together, Richard and Andrea teach people in a wide variety of businesses how to reprogram the way they think about the word “No.”  Their articles have been published in hundreds of online and offline journals, including several times in Success Magazine

Ray Higdon is a two-time bestselling author and a former top income earner in a network marketing company that he joined while he was in foreclosure. He has shared the stage with Tony Robbins, Bob Proctor, Les Brown, Robert Kiyosaki and many more. Ray and his wife Jessica no longer build a network marketing company so they can better serve the profession as coaches, speakers, and trainers. Their coaching company was recognized on the Inc. 5,000 as one of America’s fastest growing companies. Ray and Jessica love helping network marketers grow large teams and create freedom in their life.

Comments

comments

(Visited 275 times, 1 visits today)

Related posts

Comment
Shares